Session I: A Short History of Photography

Anthony Prevost:

In my photographic response to the Walter Benjamin’s text “A Short history of Photography” I wanted to nod to some of his claims in thetext: The optical unconscious and the power of photography to show us a world that the eye misses. The Aura of an original and itsrelationship to the reproduction of the original. Walter Benjamin and his ambiguous relationship to surrealism. And Walter Benjamin’sview of Adget’s photos as scenes of crime, he says: “But is not every spot of our cities a crime scene? Every passer-by a perpetrator?”For me here nestles a future in Adget’s photos and in Walter Benjamin’s interpretation: You guessed it: CCTV!

 

Ernst Schlogelhofer:

In my photographic response to the Walter Benjamin’s text “A Short history of Photography” I wanted to nod to some of his claims in thetext: The optical unconscious and the power of photography to show us a world that the eye misses. The Aura of an original and itsrelationship to the reproduction of the original. Walter Benjamin and his ambiguous relationship to surrealism. And Walter Benjamin’sview of Adget’s photos as scenes of crime, he says: “But is not every spot of our cities a crime scene? Every passer-by a perpetrator?”For me here nestles a future in Adget’s photos and in Walter Benjamin’s interpretation: You guessed it: CCTV!

 

Rakesh Mohindra:

Image titles: Ernst, Yuxin, Rakesh all from the series A Short History of Image Assembly, 2016

The starting point for my work is often based on something I am experiencing.

I wanted to commemorate the start of Image Assembly, and the journey we went on to bring it to life as well as the new triangular relationship between Ernst, Yuxin and myself as cofounders.

I was experimenting with using the zoom & flash combination on the camera to get an effect of something coming into focus. I also was looking to challenge Benjamin’s concept of an aura, what that really is and how I believe any image can have a special distinctive atmosphere or quality not just original paintings or early photography.

 

Yuxin Jiang

Dauthendey Karl Dauthenday (1819–1896) was a photographer working in Leipzig, St Petersburg and Würzburg. The photograph under discussion has been titled ‘The photographer Karl Dauthendey with his betrothed Miss Friedrich after their first attendance at church, 1857’. It has been established that Benjamin mistakes the woman for Dauthendey’s first wife, who committed suicide. It actually shows his second wife, from a decade later than assumed. See Rolf Kruass, Walter Benjamin und der neue Blick auf die Photographie (Ostfildern, 1998), p.22.

From On Photography, Walter Benjamin, edited and translated by Esther Leslie, p.96.

The mistake Benjamin made was perhaps driven by his eagerness of arguing for the camera’s capability to reveal the unconscious, which fails in this example.

Although Miss Friedrich’s gaze does not necessarily look ominous, nor could it tell the future, it does puzzle the beholder – what is she looking at? It seems to be more interesting to look at her than Dauthendey, Is it because she escaped our gaze?

Here are some more similar photos. Our gaze is returned without them turning towards us.

 

Xiaobo Fu:

In my photographic response to the Walter Benjamin’s text “A Short history of Photography” I wanted to nod to some of his claims in thetext: The optical unconscious and the power of photography to show us a world that the eye misses. The Aura of an original and itsrelationship to the reproduction of the original. Walter Benjamin and his ambiguous relationship to surrealism. And Walter Benjamin’sview of Adget’s photos as scenes of crime, he says: “But is not every spot of our cities a crime scene? Every passer-by a perpetrator?”For me here nestles a future in Adget’s photos and in Walter Benjamin’s interpretation: You guessed it: CCTV!

apteka mujchine for man ukonkemerovo woditely driver.